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The Everglades a wonderous place

30th Mar 2013

Did you know?

Native Americans called the Everglades pahayokee, or the grassy waters.

The ecosystem protects more than 14 endangered and more than nine threatened species, including the Florida panther,

the Atlantic Ridley turtle and the American crocodile.

Calusa Indians inhabited South Florida as soon as 1000 B.C. Their highly developed

culture traveled long canoe trails and left artifacts such as shell tools and carved wood.

The Calusa declined with the introduction of disease by European settlers and were eventually replaced by

tribes from the Creek nation. Gladesmen, the Florida equivalent of the American West's mountain

man, survived off the land, hunting, trapping and staying in camps up until the creation of the national park.

Airboats, shallow-draft craft with a large propeller in the rear that uses air to propel the boat, are a classic form

of transportation in the Everglades. Several Florida old-timers claim to have invented the cross between an

airplane and a boat, but the airboat was perfected in Nova Scotia in 1905.

Take an everglades tour and airboat ride 

Learn more about the everglades