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Bachman's Warbler | Everglades Tours

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The Bachman's ("back-mans") warbler is a very rare summer resident of southeastern floodplain forests. These neotropical migratory birds are

approximately 4.0-4.5 inches (10-11 cm) long with a yellow to drab olive breast and face; an ashy, olive-colored back; and a short, curved black beak.

Males also have a black throat patch and olive crown. Their call is described as a distinctive buzzy "zeep." These warblers nest in thickened canopy

openings dominated by river cane, dwarf palmetto, blackberry and similar species. Bachman's warblers migrate in late summer to wintering grounds

in Cuba and return early in the spring. Bachman's warbler has long been considered one of North America's rarest songbirds. The bird was listed as

critically endangered in 1967, and no official sightings have been reported in several decades.

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In 2001, however, reliable sightings were reported at Congaree National Park. Subsequent searches failed to document any Bachman's warblers,

but the study provided important insights into long-term ecological trends and calls for hope in conserving other species currently in decline. critically

endangered in 1967, and no official sightings have been reported in several decades. In 2001, however, reliable sightings were reported at Congaree

National Park. Subsequent searches failed to document any Bachman's warblers, but the study provided important insights into long-term ecological trends

and calls for hope in conserving other species currently in decline. Congaree National Park. Subsequent searches failed to document any Bachman's warblers,

but the study provided important insights into long-term ecological trends and calls for hope in conserving other species currently in decline. 

Everglades Eco-Safari Half Day Tour 

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